Eruslu Nonwoven Group Ordered Spunlace Line from Andritz

International Technology Group Andritz has received an order from Eruslu Nonwoven Group to supply a complete neXline spunlace line for its plant located in Gaziantep.

The line has a production capacity of 18,000 t/a and is scheduled for installation and start-up at the beginning of 2021.

This new spunlace eXcelle line will be able to process a wide range of fibers, like polyester, viscose, lyocell, and bleached cotton, with grammages from 30 up to 75 gsm. It will produce high-quality wet wipes for cosmetics applications, fem care and baby diapers, dust wipes, hair dressing towels, medical bandages and gauzes, and many other products. The new line will enable Eruslu to diversify its product portfolio into new technical applications.

Andritz will deliver a complete line, from web forming to drying.

The scope of supply includes:

  • One complete set of Laroche opening and blending machinery,
  • Two inline high-speed TT cards,
  • One JetlaceEssentiel unit, which is the benchmark for hydroentanglement processes, Including an Andritz full filtration unit,
  • One neXdry double drum through-air dryer,
  • One neXecodry S1 system for energy saving

The Fourth Spunlace Line Order

Andritz and Eruslu have a long-term and successful collaboration that began in 2009. This is the fourth spunlace line to be provided by Andritz, and it confirms the strong partnership between the two companies.

Eruslu Nonwoven Group, established in 1972, is a leading Turkish company specialized in the production of various textile products. In the nonwovens sector, the Group provides disposable products for the home cleaning and health sectors.

Güney Biomedical Takes Its Place in the Medical Textile Sector with Mask Production

Güney Biomedical, which is a sub-branch of the Teknik Fuarcılık Group, seized its place among the companies engaged in the textile sector by making new breakthroughs in the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic outbreak. Güney Biomedical, which has just entered to manufacturing experience, produces approximately 250 thousand masks every day.

Many businesses during the troublesome Coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic period conducted studies on textile products such as protective masks, gloves, surgical coveralls that protect against the spread of the pandemic. Güney Biomedical, having started its production life with a capacity of manufacturing 250 thousand masks per day, sold a large volume of products in spite of its new establishment. Moreover, the company’s efforts towards exports continue at full speed.

Güney Biomedical, producing masks in the standards of European Union countries, also attaches great importance to production in a hygienic and sterile environment. The company uses the HEPA filter air conditioner and ventilation system used by the European Union countries during the manufacturing process of the protective masks in its production area and produces its masks in a fashion that is entirely for human health.

Production takes place in a hygienic environment

Güney Biomedical, in addition to being especially hygienic, attaches significant importance to the comfortable use of the masks produced under the brand name of ‘besafe’.

The manufacturing stages of the masks takes place as follows:

The masks, which are prepared by employees equipped with special outfits, are untouched and consist of three layers of fabric. These masks are then fitted with polypropylene (pp) coated soft and adjustable nose wires through the utilization of a special system in ultrasonic devices. Later on, these masks are steered to the unit where the tires are attached. Masks fitted with tires on special machines are delivered to the quality and control team. Masks, which are approved by the quality and control department, are sorted and packaged in the packaging machine.

Güney Biomedical manufactures four types of masks, which consist of three layers of spunbond (blue and white) and three layers of meltblown (blue and white). The inner surface of the mask consists of a soft absorbent and hypoallergenic nonwoven layer. In the middle layer; there is spunbond/meltblown filter nonwoven fabric and the outer layer has hydrophobic spunbond nonwoven fabric. The masks that eliminate pressure on the ears through the usage of the comfortable elastic ear loop, do not hurt or cause any cuts in the ear thanks to the latex-free round rubbers and nonwoven fabrics. These masks, which protect against viruses, air pollution, dust and pollen, do not cause allergic reactions because of their hygienic manufacturing processes and quality materials.

Elastic Nonwovens and Application Areas

Deniz Duran1, Hatice Aktekeli2

1Ege University – Faculty of Engineering – Textile Engineering Department.35100 Bornova, İzmir/TÜRKİYE

2Ege University – Faculty of Engineering – Textile Engineering Department., 35100 Bornova, İzmir/TÜRKİYE

deniz.duran@ege.edu.tr

 

Elastic Nonwovens and Application Areas

Abstract

Nonwoven surfaces have become one of the fastest-growing textile branches in recent years, which significantly stems from the practical use of disposable products, and awareness on its importance in terms of hygiene. It is desired that nonwoven surfaces used in some areas should have high flexibility in terms of comfort and ease of use and maintain this flexibility. For this reason, there is a day-by-day increasing interest in flexible nonwoven surfaces. In this study, the definition of flexible nonwoven surfaces, methods for obtaining flexible nonwoven surfaces and their application areas are specified.

Key Words:Nonwoven surface; Flexible nonwoven surface; Elastic nonwovens; Thermoplastic elastomer.

  1. INTRODUCTION

In the globalizing world, it has become a necessity to manufacture innovative products for the development of our industry and economy. Cost and speed are two of the most important factors in the production phase. In this area, nonwoven surfaces allow us to find fast, easy, effective and economical solutions to problems with their wide use at every stage of modern life. Nonwoven surface products offer manufacturers the advantage of simplicity in the manufacturing process and the ability to apply desired qualities (absorbent/retaining, soft/stretched etc.) to nonwoven surface products as they require a manufacturing process simpler than the conventional textile fabrics. [1]

Nonwoven surface products, which are manufactured in a fashion both faster and cheaper, are being used more ever day in new areas. Especially the increase in the practical use and usage habits of disposable products allow mobility in the nonwoven surface industry and caused the market to grow. When examining Turkey’s 22 main product groups in the technical textiles export, it is observed that nonwoven surface products constitute the most exported product groups of Turkey’s technical textile exports. Nonwoven surface products which form 30,9% of Turkey’s total exports of technical textiles (nonwoven) exports in 2017 were valued at approximately 479 million dollars, increasing by 9,5%. When examining the technical textiles imports in Turkey’s 22 basic product groups, it is seen that nonwoven surface products are the second imported products with 11,5% after glas fiber and their products. In 2017, imports of nonwoven surface products increased by 12% to approximately $ 220 million. [1, 2]

Demand for nonwoven surface products is increasing day by day and it is predicted that over the coming years the numbers will exceed today’s value. [3]

In the field of nonwoven products, products with a high degree of flexibility at low cost is constantly needed. these nonwoven products are being produced especially for disposable diapers, sick cloths and also areas such as lining, and filtration. They are preferred for flexibility, softness, durability, good stretch-backing properties and high tearing elongation features. [4]

There are also literature studies on elastic nonwovens –an important issue in innovations which have taken place in the nonwoven surface area in recent years.

In a study by Srinivas et al., they treated polypropylene homopolymer and thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) under the same conditions and observed a marked difference in elongation properties. The polypropylene homopolymer is only 35% elongated, while the surfaces produced with thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) can be elongated up to 360%. According to Srinivas et al., molecular parameters such as molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, composition, melting temperature and crystallinity grade affect the elastic behavior of the polymer. The elasticity of the web is related to the molecular weight and the specific elastomeric composition. As expected, low crystallinity requires high elasticity. As the level of crystallinity increases, the mechanical behavior of the polymer changes from an elastomeric character to a plastic one.[5]

Zhao states in his work that the industry focused on the meltblown process to develop unique fiber and surface properties using special polymers, and that many factors are needed to develop high-value meltblown products, among which polymer properties, targeted areas of use of the product, and properties and capabilities of meltblown equipment are mentioned. Polypropylene nonwovens produced with the meltblown method have attracted more attention in areas such as hygiene, medical and personal care products with high flexibility of nonwovens made of elastic raw material, although they may have one-sided stretching properties. [6]

Dharmarajan et al., used the meltblown method in their work for surface preparation and have blended thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and classical polypropylene on some samples. Inclusion of polypropylene thermoplastic elastomer increases the elongation of the nonwoven surface. Surface elasticity increases with increasing TPE ratio. Even 30% weight of TPE content makes the surface softer and drapery than polypropylene. In the light of these results, they have stated that meltblown elastic nonwovens containing TPE polymers have offered a new elastomeric product, which can be used in hygiene, personal care, medicine and industrial applications. [7]

Li et al. used the thermoplastic elastomer in their study to produce a surface with the meltblown method. According to Li et al., the elastic meltblown nonwovens have incomparable advantages over ordinary meltblown surface. Therefore, they have stated that this material is the new favorite in the nonwoven industry and elastic nonwovens produced with the meltblown method using TPE are high elastic materials which can solve the low elasticity problem of the conventional nonwovens. [8]

 

  1. ELASTIC NONWOVENS

Materials imposed to deformeation under pressure (elongation/ change of form) and reverted to its original state when unpressured are called elastic materials, and such deformations are called as elastic deformation. Mechanical creep (almost) does not occur. [9]

Elastic nonwovens are products, which exhibit superior elongation/reversibility compared to conventional nonwoven surfaces. While the elasticity on the conventional nonwoven surfaces is around 30%, it can reach 300% on elastic nonwoven surfaces. [5]

The limited resilience of the surfaces produced using conventional synthetic raw materials causes limitations in their usage and application. On surfaces produced using special thermoplastic elastomers (TPE), this problem can be avoided and highly elastic surfaces can be created (Figure 1). This will allow limitations and combine with the advantages of meltblown method to find a more common and convenient area of use. [6]

Elastic nonwoven surface before stretching     Elastic nonwoven surface after stretching

Figure 1. Elastic nonwoven surface before and after stretching [10]

2.1. Elastic Nonwoven Production Methods

Elasticity can be achieved in the texture in different ways. The most important ones are:

2.1.1. Customized voluminous design for nonwoven web structure

Voluminous web structure can be achieved by needle method in particular. In this method, the fibers are laid smoothly on top of each other to form a surface and fixed with special needles to form a web surface. However, the surfaces produced in this method can be too thick and show little flexibility.

2.1.2. Achieving elasticity in materials using crimp fibers

As the crimp fibers on surfaces produced by using crimp fibers are opened under pressure, the surface will stretch and revert to its original state when unpressured. However, the flexibility obtained by this method is very insufficient.

2.1.3. Production using special meltblown method with raw materials

The meltblown method does not require a special preparation process to form the surface, nor does it need to prepare any solution to draw fibers. Fibers are taken directly from the polymers.

In the meltblown method, the special thermoplastic material (TPE) is heated in the extruder and melted up to the temperature and viscosity to provide the fiber formation. The melt is sprayed through the nozzle holes at high speed with a flow of hot air, and these micro-sized fibers become cool and solidify as they move towards the pick-up cylinder. The solidified fibers randomly orientated in the picking cylinder create the elastic nonwoven surface. [11]

2.1.4. Production with finishing operations such as coating

The nonwoven surface is created by covering one or both sides of the surface with a chemical substance. The chemical materials are applied on the surface in the form of powder, paste or foam to form a film layer on the ground. [12]

2.1.5. Production with composite technology

Composite materials are a group of material, which are created by bringing together at least two different materials for a specific purpose. The purpose in this three-dimensional assembling feature is to create a feature, which is not present in any of the components alone. In other words, it is aimed to produce a material with superior properties for the desired components. [13]

The elasticity of the web produced with the first two methods is limited while they have excessive thickness. Flexibility of the web obtained with the coating method is not at the desired level. It has been seen that problems are solved in the web produced using TPE chips. [8]

  1. THERMOPLASTIC ELASTOMER (TPE) – RAW MATERIAL FOR ELASTIC NONWOVENS

Crosslinked rubbery polymers, or rubbery webbands, which exhibit very high elongation under tensile force and revert to their original initial length when the force is lifted, are called elastomers. The most commonly used and known elastomers are polyisoprene (or natural rubber), polybutadiene, polyisobutylene and polyurethane.

Thermoplastic elastomers (TPE’s) are polymers that exhibit elastomer behaviors, even though they do not have chemical cross-links between their molecules.

The physical cross-links in the TPEs constitute the webbing structure by interlocking the flexible molecules together. They can be processed as thermoplastics at high temperatures and exhibit elastomeric behavior when cooled (Figure 2). The transition from thermoplastic behavior to elastomeric behavior is completely reversed, i.e. unlike conventional elastomers, thermoplastic elastomers can be processed repeatedly, so they can be recycled. [14]

Thermoplastic elastomers contain two distinct phases in their texture:

  • Elastomeric phase with rubber features
  • Rigid phase with thermoplastic features. [14]

Figure 2. Temperature change in the thermoplastic elastomer structure [15]

 

  1. APPLICATION AREAS OF ELASTIC NONWOVENS

Elastic nonwovens find use in the fields of filtration, medicine and hygiene as soft protective cap, lining and gloves.

  • Medicine and Hygiene

Research and development studies in both fiber types, in which materials used in medicine and hygiene applications are produced, and in the production techniques of such materials, cause the increase in the use of medicine and hygiene textiles in all technical textiles every day. [16]

The fastest developments in medicine and hygiene textiles have occurred after the discovery of synthetic fibers. Rapid developments have been achieved with the invention nonwoven products in the 1960s, and improving a 56% reduction in the risk of infection transmission with the use of disposable products in 1985. [17]

 

The most important use of nonwovens is the hygiene industry. In a report published by  EDANA – European Nonwoven Producers Association, 35 billion products have been sold in the European hygiene market in 1997, 90 billion in 2004 and 211 billion in 2013 (Figure 3). [18]

Figure 3. The number of nonwoven products sold in the European hygiene market

 

Especially the elastic nonwoven medical bandages exhibit excellent stretching, wrap the wound well, hel healing quickly and leave only a small trace. Patients using them feel comfortable and at ease.

Its porous structure allows skin moisture to penetrate and the skin to breathe. Its elastic structure easily conforms to body folds and joints.

 

In addition, these elastic nonwoven materials also find use in areas such as patients and diapers (Fig. 4), menstrual pads, and in hospital equipment such as surgical disposals and gowns that require disposability, non-slipperiness and elasticity. [8]

Figure 4. Patient diaper with elastic nonwoven materials [19]

 

  • Soft Stretching Caps

It significantly increases comfort, safety and work efficiency for workers. It is non-irritant, soft-textured and has high tensile strength with low shrinkage force. They have a breathable structure for perfect comfort and ease. It provides excellent barrier treatment and filtration performance (Figure 5).

  • For use in construction, mining, health and waste management to prevent dirt, dust, airborne particles and airborne liquids,
  • For protection against dust, bacteria and harmful chemicals in laboratories and factories,
Figure 5. Caps with elastic nonwoven material [10]
  • For shielding against outdoor activities, wind and rain,
  • In order to provide good bacteria and particulate filtration in medical use,
  • It can be used for undercoating in hard caps, emergency respiratory masks and other face protection equipment. [10]

Undercoating

A study conducted by researchers at the University of Tennessee, USA, of Materials Science and Engineering reveals that the use of elastic nonwoven as a primer in military apparel shows better filtering features against chemical and biological threats.

Also, undercoating made of such structures in sportswear and women’s clothing helps show the body better. [8]

  • Filtration

These structures, produced using microfiber fibers, have great market share thanks to their superior filtration performance.

These elastic nonwovens, which can also be used in production of masks, provide protection against gas, dust and bacteria in the medical field by preventing harmful granules (Figure 6). Also these filters can be used in AC units, automobiles and engines[8].

 

Figure 6. Mask with elastic nonwoven material [20]

  • Gloves

Elastic nonwoven gloves are used in pharmaceutical factories and research laboratories, where high protection is required thanks to their excellent stretching, absorbing and filtering features. [8]

  1. CONCLUSION

Elastic nonwovens provide balanced mechanical features thanks to better elongation for increased flexibility, higher impact strength, higher melt flow rate for easier machining, lower cost and higher performance in comparison with conventional nonwovens. Especially on machine applications, they exhibit better breaking resilience and tearing prolongation. [21]

Thanks to these features, the application area for elastic nonwovens is growing day by day. The studies conducted in this area is also increasing every day. Interest and researches in the elastic nonwovens, which is considered to be one of the important branches in nonwoven industry, are increasing thanks to the improvements in living standards rising with awareness on the importance of  disposable products especialy for health, advanced level of improved product performances and the R&D activities conducted by the leading companies to grow their market domination.

RESOURCES

[1]KDR Tekstil, http://www.kdrtekstil.com.tr/bilgi-3.php (Erişim tarihi: 13.05.2016)

[2]ITKIB, Teknik Tekstil Sektörüne İlişkin Güncel Bilgiler, Mart 2015, http://www.itkib.org.tr/ihracat/DisTicaretBilgileri/raporlar/dosyalar/2015/TEKNIK_TEKSTIL_SEKTORUNE_ILISKIN_GUNCEL_BILGILER-MART_2015.pdf (Erişim tarihi: 05.04.2016)

[3]Textotex, Hijyen Uygulamalarında Nonwoven Teknolojisi, http://www.textotex.com/haber/tekniktekstil/hijyen-uygulamalarinda-nonwoven-teknolojisi.html (Erişim tarihi: 03.11.2015)

[4]Boggs L., Elastic polyetherester nonwoven web, 1987, US 4707398 A.

[5]Srinivas, S., Cheng, C. Y., Dharmarajan, N. and Racine G., 2005, “Elastic Nonwoven Fabrics from Polyolefin Elastomers”, http://faculty.mu.edu.sa/public/uploads/1426341765.4035Elastic_Nonwoven_Fabrics.pdf (Erişim tarihi: 10.10.2015)

[6]Zhou R., 2004, Stretching the Value of Melt Blown with Cellulose Microfiber and Elastic Resins, Biax Fiberfilm Corporation, 13p.

[7]Dharmarajan R., Kacker S., Gallez V., Westwood A.D. and Cheng C.Y., Meltblown Elastic Nonwovens from Specialty Polyolefin Elastomers, ExxonMobil Chemical Company, 3p.

[8]Li L., Zhang J., Li S. and Qian X., 2011, Research Progress of Elastic Nonwovens with Meltblown Technology, Advanced Materials Research, Vols. 332-334, 1247-1252pp.

[9]Yalçınkaya E., Elastisite Teorisi(Stress-Strain) Gerilme-Deformasyon İlişkisi, https://iujfk.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/3-ders-elastisite.pdf, (Erişim Tarihi: 28.04.2016)

[10]Vitaflex, http://vitaflexllc.com/index.html, (Erişim Tarihi: 19.10.2015)

[11]Atul Dahiya, M., Kamath, G. and  Raghavendra, R., 2004, Meltblown Technology, http://www.engr.utk.edu/mse/Textiles/Melt%20Blown%20Technology.htm (Erişim tarihi: 13.10.2015)

[12]Bulut Y., Sülar V., 2008, Kaplama veya Laminasyon Teknikleri ile Üretilen Kumaşların Genel Özellikleri ve Performans Testleri, Tekstil ve Mühendis, Sayı:70-71, 5-16.

[13]Kompozit Malzemeler Hakkkında Her şey, http://www.bilgiustam.com/kompozit-malzemeler-hakkinda-hersey/(Erişim Tarihi: 21.09.2016)

[14]Esen, M., “Termoplastik Elastomerler”, http://www.kimyam.net/2012/09/elastomer-nedir.html (Erişim tarihi: 26.10.2015)

[15]Deniz V., Karakaya N., Karaağaç B., Aytaç A. ve Gümüş S., 2008, Stirenik Termoplastik Elastomer Malzeme Geliştirilmesi, TÜBİTAK MAG Proje 107M412, 58s.

[16]Ilgaz S., Duran D., Mecit D., Bayraktar G., Gülümser T. ve Tarakçıoğlu I., Medikal Tekstiller, Tekstil Teknik Dergisi, Şubat 2007, Yıl-23, Sayı 265, 138-162.

[17]Güney S., 2009, Peristaltik Hareket Sağlayan Tıbbi Tekstil Materyalinin Geliştirilmesi ve Bilgisayarlı Kontrolü, Süleyman Demirel Üniversitesi, Yüksek Lisans Tezi, Isparta, 70s.

[18]Anonim, 2010, Nonwoven Tekniği ile Hijyenik, http://www.bilgilerforumu.com/forum/konu/nonwoven-teknigi-ile-hijyenik.630333/,  (Erişim Tarihi: 10.02.2016)

[19]Can Kimya, http://www.tamtut.com/tr/fullbond-urunler/20/yetiskin-ve-hasta-bezi-hotmelt-yapistiricilari, (Erişim Tarihi: 30.09.2016)

[20]ASM Medical, http://www.asmmedical.com/cat/aile-hekimligi-sarf-malzemeleri/sayfa/2, (Erişim Tarihi: 30.09.2016)

[21]ExxonMobil Chemical, 2010, Vistamaxx™ propylene-based elastomer,

http://www.ktron.com/News/Seminars/Plastics/Houston/Vistamaxx_-_PBE-An_innovation_for_the_masterbatch_industry.cfm, (Erişim Tarihi: 24.09.2015)

Huggies Awards Grants Through No Baby Unhugged Program

Hugging programs train volunteers to administer the soothing and healing power of touch to premature babies.

‘The Huggies No Baby Unhugged program’ is awarding seven $10,000 grants to help support or establish volunteer hugging programs in hospitals across the country. Hugging programs train volunteers to administer the soothing and healing power of touch to babies who are premature or medically fragile, with the goal of improving long-term health out- comes.“The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) can be a place of uncertainty, and parents may often feel overwhelmed by responsibilities outside of the hospital that keep them from being with their baby 24/7,” says Kristin Carnall of Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta at Egleston. “Numerous studies show the positive benefits of holding, rocking and soothing on infant weight gain, stress reduction, improved sleep and future language development. We are incredibly grateful to have received the No Baby Unhugged grant to support our NICU families in providing a comfortable, encouraging, intentional space for parents to deliver skin-to-skin care to their infants.”

Since the No Baby Unhugged program was initiated in 2016, Huggies has awarded $250,000 in grants to 25 hospitals, allowing hospitals to invest in volunteer training and recruitment, hugger chairs and educational materials for volunteers.

“We understand the power of hugs and gentle human touch for conveying safety, security and love to babies during this critical time in their development,” says Sara Young, general manager of the Huggies Brand. “Volunteer hugging programs are integral to supporting nurses, comforting parents and promoting healing and growth for babies. Huggies continues to be inspired by these hospitals’ dedication to the infants they treat and remains committed to providing resources to bolster hugging programs.”

OUTLOOK™ 2018 Signed as Most Successful Editon Ever

Over 500 key stakeholders gather for premier nonwoven personal care products and hygiene conference.

With 510 delegates from across the nonwovens and related industries in attendance, OUTLOOK™, the primary conference for the nonwovens hygiene and personal care industry, was again confirmed as a key industry event for the sector, showcasing EDANA’s mission to support the growth and promote the sustainable development of the industry.

The conference examined new product developments, market trends, performance and safety testing and sustainability initiatives during the first two days, with the final day featuring an interactive workshop on building stakeholder trust. Feedback from participants throughout the event emphasised satisfaction with the mix and quality of expert content and the many opportunities to meet with industry peers. With the conference attracting participants from across the whole supply chain and around the globe, OUTLOOK™ again confirmed its position as a unique must-attend event for nonwoven professionals.

“One of the most successful OUTLOOK conferences I have experienced”

Mark Siebert of Berry Global said he found the event to be “one of the most successful OUTLOOK conferences I have experienced.  The record attendance and senior leader participation provided invaluable input on industry dynamics that will shape our participation for the next 5 years.”

The conference, the 17th edition of OUTLOOK™, opened with a keynote speech on EU circular economy and plastics strategies from Werner Bosmans, DG Environment, European Commission. This was followed with a session dedicated to circular economy and sustainability topics. Day 2 of the conference was opened by a presentation from Professor Samuele Furfari of the Free University of Brussels on the geopolitical challenges of the changing energy landscape. Delegates also heard from industry experts on market trends, technical innovations and multiple efforts to introduce further sustainable business practices in the nonwovens industry.

“This edition of OUTLOOK has again featured, as deliberately planned these last few years, a very topical programme, directly addressing the current challenges in our industry, “said Pierre Wiertz, General Manager of EDANA. “Discussions on the circular economy strategy, transparency and trust in the supply chain were both thought-provoking and rewarding. It is very encouraging to witness the industry’s increasing readiness to engage in these topics and for EDANA to facilitate constructive dialogue on both strategic and practical solutions. I was also very enthused by the insight of significant industry players on key trends and some very exciting technical innovations in our sector.”

The Trützschler Card TC 19i: The First Intelligent Card

A new chapter in card development has been be opened: The Trützschler card is intelligent. It performs important settings completely independently and with a precision not achievable by humans, which results in an unprecedented level of quality.

A new chapter in card development has been be opened: The Trützschler card is intelligent. It performs important settings completely independently and with a precision not achievable by humans, which results in an unprecedented level of quality.

Is there a formula for successful innovations? Definitely not. But how does Trützschler manage to continuously raise the bar in carding technology? How can the Trützschler Card TC15 be surpassed in terms of quality and performance?

“The dialogue with our customers is decisive for our developments. We listen to them very carefully when they talk about unresolved problems. High raw material costs, personnel bottlenecks and fluctuating raw material qualities combined with constantly high quality requirements are among the present circumstances that need to be overcome.” Markus Wurster, Sales Director.

The fact that Trützschler has the technical competence to implement these requirements was demonstrated once again at ITMA 2019.

“This is the future!” and “This is the development we need!” were the reactions of booth visitors which sales manager Ralf Müller experienced at this year’s ITMA. “The possibility to increase quality and productivity as well as solving personnel issues through features like T-GO or Wastecontrol fascinated our customers.”

TC 19i main features at a glance:

Self-optimizing precision

For cotton carding, the carding gap between the cylinder and flat clothing should be as small as possible. The optimum gap is 3/1000” (0.075mm) for many types of cotton. For comparison: Not even a sheet of paper fits inbetween. Even an experienced technologist cannot carry out such narrow settings when the card is cold. During operation, centrifugal forces and temperature increases influence these settings significantly.

On the Trützschler Card TC 19i with the Gap Optimizer T-GO, a basic flat setting is only carried out once by our specialists. Afterwards, T-GO ensures an ideal carding gap at all times, whether the card is cold or warm, after clothing grinding, even after clothing replacement. This is a permanent, self-optimizing, intelligent process that takes place without any production interruption.

The key to the profitability of a spinning mill is the maximum utilization of the raw material. On TC 19i, an optical sensor monitors the waste in the suction, thus providing the data for Wastecontrol. If too many good fibers end up in the waste, the system adjusts the mote knife setting on the Webfeed via a servomotor.

Permanent quality control

The Trützschler Nep Sensor NCT (separat option) permanently monitors the web on the doffer. A camera registers and distinguishes neps, trash particles and seed coat fragments. The data is displayed on the screen of the cards and also transmitted to the Trützschler mill monitoring system My Mill. In this way, multiple cards can be monitored regarding quality delivery, and any deviation will immediately be recognized.

Smart and easy operation

The TC 19i provides a multitouch screen that can be used as easily and intuitively as a smartphone. Individual operator recognition and authorization is possible through an RFID chip. In addition, the remote card display T-LED visualizes important machine information in an easy way and helps operators to stay aware of each machine’s status.

Jürgen März, carding specialist at Trützschler, received a lot of positive feedback at ITMA: “By talking to our customers about problems in their mills, we learned about their dependence on skilled staff. The precision of the flat setting is highly influenced by the operator, but reliable and well-trained personnel is difficult to find today. Customers were very impressed by the fact that very narrow settings can be set completely independent. The carding gap is no longer set by a technician, but by an intelligent system. The limitations of human precision have been overcome by Trützschler machinery at this point.”

Smart Textiles To Fight Mosquitoes: A New Approach

A report by the World Health Organisation (WHO) claimed mosquitoes to be the deadliest and most dangerous species on planet in terms of human deaths. In 2015, 438,000 malaria-related deaths were reported globally. The incidence of dengue has reportedly increased 30 times in the last three decades. Several countries are reporting their first outbreaks of mosquito-borne diseases such as zika, dengue, chikungunya and yellow fever.

With the ever increasing cases of resistance of mosquitoes to repellents, several groups have tried incorporating new repellents into fabrics. There have been several efforts towards designing smart textiles that can prevent mosquito bites. Microencapsulation has been commonly used. However, these methods are prone to drawbacks like non-sustainability and lack of reusability. Another approach uses microbeads, which again are costly and tedious. This restricts the use of conventional microbeads and micro-capsules for practical day-to-day applications.

The solution proposed by its research team adds the necessary advantages of in-trend micro-encapsulation technique and gets rid of their drawbacks.

The proposed idea is to use a smart textile system that incorporates a refillable mechanism that can be reloaded multiple times with mosquito repellents on the go, controllable by the user. This work demonstrates the superiority of sustainable smart textiles to be used as a platform for mosquito repellent technology.

Making use of shape memory polymers (SMPs) for this purpose, the concept is new and gives the user the advantage to control the release of repellent multiple times, depending on need. SMPs are smart textiles having a specific shape that is stored in their ‘memory’, which when subjected to external stimulus like heat, magnetic or electric field, change and return back to their ‘memory’ shape when the stimulus is removed. The patent for the same is under process.

kordsa

Kordsa Acquires AXIOM Materials with an Investment of USD 181 Million

Kordsa, a subsidiary of Sabancı Holding and a global player in the reinforcement technologies market, acquired US-based Axiom Materials.

This acquisition of USD 181 million paved the way for Kordsa to be the only worldwide qualified manufacturer of Oxide-Oxide ceramic matrix composites.

Kordsa has stepped into the advanced composite materials industry with Composite Technologies Center of Excellence, conjointly established with Sabancı University. Kordsa has expanded its area of operations and competencies with its 2018’s acquisitions of Fabric Development, Textile Products and Advanced Honeycomb Technologies providing advanced composite materials to the aerospace industry. With the acquisition of Axiom Materials, Kordsa has completed the first phase of its goal to build a second Kordsa in composite technologies. Widely used in aircraft engines, the value-added materials produced by Axiom Materials have different applications in various industries and are considered as the material of the future. This acquisition, which is critical to develop Kordsa’s competencies in strategic and high growth areas, strengthens Kordsa’s potential to develop new products.

Pointing out the position of Kordsa in the Holding’s vision,  as Sabancı of  New Generation, Mehmet Göçmen, Sabancı Holding CEO, said: “Dynamic portfolio management and high technology-oriented investments are critical areas of focus in the transformation process of Sabancı Group. Kordsa, the flagship of our vision to grow in high value added industries, transforms into a company capable of producing advanced material technologies with its investment of approximately USD 300 million in composite technologies in the last two years. Following the acquisition of four US-based major companies, Kordsa built a business line with annual gross revenue of over USD 150 million. With this new investments, Kordsa as the supplier of leading global companies, now becomes the only worldwide qualified manufacturer of Oxide-Oxide ceramic matrix composites. This key acquisition, which is a clear sign of our mindset to manage our business based on universal standards, will also support the development of our country in international markets.”

Cenk Alper, Sabancı Holding Industrials Group President and Chairman of Kordsa, regarding the acquisition of Axiom Materials stated: “We continue to support our organic growth in the composite technologies market with inorganic growth investments. We took the first step of our growth strategy with the Composite Technologies Center of Excellence, one of the few integrated production centers in the world. Our journey went ahead in aerospace industry with Fabric Development and Textile Products, which produce highly-engineered structural materials; our competency has expanded with the acquisition of Advanced Honeycomb Technologies, which produces advanced materials for cabin interior parts. With this investment, we will create a growth platform in North America, the aerospace hub.”

Ali Çalışkan, Kordsa CEO, regarding the purchase of Axiom Materials, which leads the composite market through its R&D studies, stated: “We took a very important step that reinforces our vision ‘Inspired from life, we reinforce life’. With the acquisition of Axiom Materials providing advanced technology composite materials to the next generation transportation vehicles as well as the aerospace industries and leading the composite market through its R&D studies, we have expanded our expertise in the field of composites and finalized the portfolio of advanced composite intermediates. With the acquisition of Axiom, we  completed the first phase of our goal to build a second Kordsa in composite technologies. Today, we are the only worldwide qualified manufacturer of Oxide-Oxide ceramic matrix composites. I am both proud and excited for the days ahead. After the tires, wings, hulls and the interior of the aircrafts, Kordsa will also reinforce aircraft engines. “

Solar Cells Embedded Clothes Can Charge Mobile Phone

Scientists from Nottingham Trent University have developed a technology to embed miniaturised solar cells into yarn that can then be knitted and woven into textiles. This can lead to clothing embedded with tiny solar cells the size of a flea which will allow wearers to generate electricity on the move and charge items like mobile phones and smartwatches.

The technology has been tested and proven to charge a mobile phone and a Fitbit. The cells are encapsulated in a resin which allows the textile fabric to be washed and worn like any other form of clothing. Measuring only three millimetres in length and 1.5 millimetres in width, the cells are almost invisible to the naked eye and cannot be felt by the wearer. For all intents and purposes, garments appear exactly the same as any other form of clothing despite having the capability to generate electricity. Project lead Professor Tilak Dias, of the School of Art and Design, said: “By embedding miniaturised solar cells into yarn we can create clothing and fabric that generate power in a sustainable way. The clothing would look and behave like any other textile, but within the fibres would be a network of miniaturised cells which are creating electricity. This could do away with the need to plug items into wall sockets and reduce the demand on the grid while cutting carbon emissions. The electrical power demand for smart e-textiles has always been its Achilles heel and this technology will allow people to use smart textiles while on the move,” Dias added.

Up to 200 miniaturised cells can generate 2.5-10 volts and up to 80 miliwatts in power. The university’s Advanced Textiles Research Group made a proof of concept textile of 5cm by 5cm size with 200 cells.

This proved powerful enough to charge a mobile phone and a Fitbit. Researchers say if 2,000 solar cells were incorporated into a textile it would generate enough power to charge a smart phone.

Researcher Achala Satharasinghe, who developed the prototype as part of his PhD at the university, said: “This is an exciting technology which could revolutionise the way we think about solar power, clothing and wearable technology. With the availability of miniaturised solar cells we can generate power in a range of new ways, by utilising things like clothing, fashion accessories, textiles and more. It will allow mobile devices to be charged in environmentally-friendly ways which are more convenient for consumers than ever before,” Satharasinghe said.

Oerlikon Presented Its Expanded Nonwovens Product Portfolio at the IDEA 2019

Oerlikon presented its complete nonwoven plant portfolio for the production of airlaid, meltblown, spunbond- ed and hybrid materials at this year’s IDEA in Miami from 25–28 March. The focus of its presentation was on solutions for hygiene, medical and other disposable nonwovens.

Visitors to this year’s IDEA can inform themselves on the wide range of products at Oerlikon’s exhibition stand.

Two strong partnerships for disposable nonwovens

While two years ago the Nonwoven business unit of the Oerlikon Manmade Fibers segment focused almost exclusively on solutions for technical applications, the company has now expanded its product portfolio to include solutions for disposable nonwovens by establishing strong partnerships.

Oerlikon & Teknoweb Materials – two strong partners for the nonwoven industry

As early as spring 2017, Oerlikon Manmade Fibers’ Nonwoven busi- ness unit had entered into a strategic partnership with the Italian company Teknoweb Materials.

Teknoweb Materials is an established technology supplier in the field of wipes and other disposable nonwovens. With its LEVRA technology, the company has its own patented, particularly efficient manufacturing process for wipes. It also has extensive process know-how on the making and further processing of these nonwoven materials. The Nonwoven busi- ness unit of Oerlikon’s Manmade Fibers segment com- pletes this partnership with its well-established machine and plant solutions. Teknoweb Materials also were be represented at IDEA at the Oerlikon exhibition stand.

Cooperation with Shaoyang Textile Machinery

For spunmelt systems solutions for hygiene and medical applications, Oerlikon has been in cooperation with the Chinese machine and plant manufacturer Shaoyang Textile Machinery since Autumn of last year. The goal of these cooperation partners is to advance the international marketing of spunmelt plants outside of China. Oerlikon Manmade Fibers’ Nonwoven business unit contributes its plant engineering know-how and is responsible for product and process guarantees. Oerlikon also assumes the overall project responsibility as well as world-wide customer service outside of China.