Archroma To Introduce New Water-Based Ultra-Low Voc Coating Technology

Archroma, a global leader in color and specialty chemicals towards sustainable solutions, has launched at the recent ITMA exhibition its new Lurapret® N5396 & N5392 liq, a water-based ultra-low VOC polyurethane (PU) polymer coating technology.

The innovation was developed in compliance with “The Archroma Way: safe, efficient, enhanced, it’s our nature”. The approach finds its origin in Archroma’s deep belief that it is possible to make the textile industry sustainable, economically and ecologically.

Coatings are used in the textile industry to achieve features such as waterproofness, flexibility, durability and UV resistance. With the growing demand for safer and more ecological products, water-based PU coatings are progressively prevailing as the preferred coating technology.

Lurapret® N5396 & N5392 liq have been developed to provide textile manufacturers with an additional water-based option that delivers high performance to the coated fabrics of demanding applications, such as indoor and outdoor textiles, nonwovens and papers.

Initially developed for the chemical bonding and coating for backpack and other industrial products, Lurapret® N5396 & N5392 liq also improve the mechanical properties of the treated material such as their tensile strength and scratch resistance.

The new products will be the core of Archroma’s Safe Seats system. The system, which combines Lurapret® N5392 & N5396 liq with Archroma’s halogen-free* Pekoflam® STC p flame retardant, allows to create a halogen-free* flame retardant coating system for synthetic leather upholstery.

Using Lurapret® N5396 & N5392 liq together with Archroma’s Nuva® N2155 & N4547 soil protection and release finishes, enables customers to achieve highest standards in water-repellence and waterproofness.

Lurapret® N5396 & N5392 liq can be applied by impregnation, coating (paste or foam), and spray, and are compliant with the ZDHC and bluesign® requirements.

“The new Lurapret® N5396 & N5392 liq coating polymers perfectly illustrate Archroma’s commitment to challenge the status quo in the deep belief that we can make our industry sustainable”, says Thomas Seeger, Global Business Development Manager for Finishing, Brand & Performance Textile Specialties, at Archroma, whilst at the same time helping our customers to develop high performance textile articles and added value for their business. That is what The Archroma Way is about. Because it’s our nature!”

* Below limits of detection
Lurapret®, Nuva® and Pekoflam® are trademarks of Archroma registered in many countries.
© 2019 Archroma

Solar Cells Embedded Clothes Can Charge Mobile Phone

Scientists from Nottingham Trent University have developed a technology to embed miniaturised solar cells into yarn that can then be knitted and woven into textiles. This can lead to clothing embedded with tiny solar cells the size of a flea which will allow wearers to generate electricity on the move and charge items like mobile phones and smartwatches.

The technology has been tested and proven to charge a mobile phone and a Fitbit. The cells are encapsulated in a resin which allows the textile fabric to be washed and worn like any other form of clothing. Measuring only three millimetres in length and 1.5 millimetres in width, the cells are almost invisible to the naked eye and cannot be felt by the wearer. For all intents and purposes, garments appear exactly the same as any other form of clothing despite having the capability to generate electricity. Project lead Professor Tilak Dias, of the School of Art and Design, said: “By embedding miniaturised solar cells into yarn we can create clothing and fabric that generate power in a sustainable way. The clothing would look and behave like any other textile, but within the fibres would be a network of miniaturised cells which are creating electricity. This could do away with the need to plug items into wall sockets and reduce the demand on the grid while cutting carbon emissions. The electrical power demand for smart e-textiles has always been its Achilles heel and this technology will allow people to use smart textiles while on the move,” Dias added.

Up to 200 miniaturised cells can generate 2.5-10 volts and up to 80 miliwatts in power. The university’s Advanced Textiles Research Group made a proof of concept textile of 5cm by 5cm size with 200 cells.

This proved powerful enough to charge a mobile phone and a Fitbit. Researchers say if 2,000 solar cells were incorporated into a textile it would generate enough power to charge a smart phone.

Researcher Achala Satharasinghe, who developed the prototype as part of his PhD at the university, said: “This is an exciting technology which could revolutionise the way we think about solar power, clothing and wearable technology. With the availability of miniaturised solar cells we can generate power in a range of new ways, by utilising things like clothing, fashion accessories, textiles and more. It will allow mobile devices to be charged in environmentally-friendly ways which are more convenient for consumers than ever before,” Satharasinghe said.

Oerlikon Presented Its Expanded Nonwovens Product Portfolio at the IDEA 2019

Oerlikon presented its complete nonwoven plant portfolio for the production of airlaid, meltblown, spunbond- ed and hybrid materials at this year’s IDEA in Miami from 25–28 March. The focus of its presentation was on solutions for hygiene, medical and other disposable nonwovens.

Visitors to this year’s IDEA can inform themselves on the wide range of products at Oerlikon’s exhibition stand.

Two strong partnerships for disposable nonwovens

While two years ago the Nonwoven business unit of the Oerlikon Manmade Fibers segment focused almost exclusively on solutions for technical applications, the company has now expanded its product portfolio to include solutions for disposable nonwovens by establishing strong partnerships.

Oerlikon & Teknoweb Materials – two strong partners for the nonwoven industry

As early as spring 2017, Oerlikon Manmade Fibers’ Nonwoven busi- ness unit had entered into a strategic partnership with the Italian company Teknoweb Materials.

Teknoweb Materials is an established technology supplier in the field of wipes and other disposable nonwovens. With its LEVRA technology, the company has its own patented, particularly efficient manufacturing process for wipes. It also has extensive process know-how on the making and further processing of these nonwoven materials. The Nonwoven busi- ness unit of Oerlikon’s Manmade Fibers segment com- pletes this partnership with its well-established machine and plant solutions. Teknoweb Materials also were be represented at IDEA at the Oerlikon exhibition stand.

Cooperation with Shaoyang Textile Machinery

For spunmelt systems solutions for hygiene and medical applications, Oerlikon has been in cooperation with the Chinese machine and plant manufacturer Shaoyang Textile Machinery since Autumn of last year. The goal of these cooperation partners is to advance the international marketing of spunmelt plants outside of China. Oerlikon Manmade Fibers’ Nonwoven business unit contributes its plant engineering know-how and is responsible for product and process guarantees. Oerlikon also assumes the overall project responsibility as well as world-wide customer service outside of China.

Groz-Beckert Felting and Carding Specialists Joined at the IDEA Miami

Groz-Beckert presented the Felting and Carding product areas at IDEA from 26 to 28 March 2019.

Over 550 exhibitors, visitors and companies from 70 countries come together at the Miami Beach Convention Center. The Felting product division of Groz-Beckert presented the innovative HyTec® P jet strip for the spunlace industry. With it, all mechanical properties improve such as scratch resistance, bending stiffness and service life thanks to its significantly higher hardness. The acrylic exhibit shows three different versions of the new HyTec® P jet strip.

Groz-Beckert will focused on special needle solutions: the EcoStar® and Gebecon® felting needle.

The special working part cross-section of the EcoStar® felting needle meets the highest demands for product surface quality in all applications. Compared with a standard felting needle, the EcoStar® felting needle achieves an energy saving of up to seven percent in the needling process.

With the Gebecon® felting needle, users also benefit from an improvedsurface quality of the end product. The patented working part design provides optimal bending resistance and results in improved needling parameters.

Enlarged scale models represent the special geometries and shapes of the Gebecon® and EcoStar® felting needles down to the last detail.A special highlight for visitors to the Groz-Beckert booth is the live demonstration on a lab-scale needling machine. This highlight the advantages of a Gebecon® felting needle compared with a standard conical felting needle via a penetration force measuring device.The Carding product area also represented at IDEA with its range of products and services. At the Groz-Beckert booth, the Carding product area presented its extensive range of services for the nonwoven industry, and visitors will have the opportunity to interact with Carding specialists.

Karl Mayer’s Machines and Webshop was at JEC World

Karl Mayer Technische Textilien presented itself as competent partner of the composite industry at JEC World, 12.-14 March 2019 in Paris, Hall 5, Stand Q 58.

Karl Mayer Technische Textilien GmbH is an important player in the composite sector, so that the participation in the leading trade fair, the JEC World, is a must for the company. Karl Mayer Technische Textilien showed innovative solutions for producing high-quality reinforcement textiles on its information stand in Paris Nord Villepinte Exhibition Center.

Karl Mayer Technische Textilien’s exhibited products include are; namely the COP MAX 4 as a flexible multi-axial warp knitting machine intended for the manufacture of multilayered, multi-axial structures with angles ranging between maximum +20° and -20° as well as the COP MAX 5 especially designed for processing carbon fibers. For the efficient spreading of fiber tapes, the company displayed its fiber spreading unit UD 700. The guests gathered information on the high-tech machines by means of video presentations, print media and during discussions with the Karl Mayer specialists, and they also learned more about the technical features. Besides, the visitors were have the opportunity to get information on Karl Mayer’s latest development trends regarding the production of continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic tapes. Another focal point of the exhibition was the topic: Karl Mayer Webshop Spare Parts. The customers from the technical textiles sector were have the chance to try out on the spot how easy it is to place orders by using Karl Mayer’s well-tried tool.

‘Cool’ Textile Automatically Regulates Amount of Heat that Passes Through It

Made from specially engineered infrared-sensitive yarn, which responds to changes in the temperature and humidity of a person’s skin by dynamically collapsing or expanding the structure of its fibers, the newly-developed textile shows great potential in the development of clothing systems capable of autonomously adapting to demanding environments.

The human body absorbs and sheds much of its heat in the form of infrared radiation. Most textiles trap this energy, which keeps us warm in cold weather. However, the development of a material that is able to shed this energy, and thus passively cool the body, has remained a challenge. While other materials have achieved radiative cooling in various forms, through textiles that can reflect sunlight and also allow heat radiating from a person’s body to escape, none are responsive to environmental changes or possess the ability to regulate both heating and cooling. The base yarn for the new infrared-adaptive textile is created with fibers made of two different synthetic materials — one absorbs water and the other repels it. The strands are coated with carbon nanotubes, a special class of lightweight, carbon-based, conductive metal.Because materials in the fibers both resist and absorb water, the fibers warp when exposed to humidity such as that surrounding a sweating body.

That distortion brings the strands of yarn closer together, which does two things. First, it opens the pores in the textile. This has a small cooling effect because it allows heat to escape. Second, and most importantly, it modifies the electromagnetic coupling between the carbon nanotubes in the coating.

Professor YuHuang Wang, also from the University of Maryland said “It’s a very simplified way to think of it, but imagine bringing two antennae close together to regulate the kind of electromagnetic wave they pick up. When the fibers are brought closer together, the radiation they interact with changes. In clothing, that means the fabric interacts with the heat radiating from the human body.”

Depending on the tuning, the textile either blocks infrared radiation or allows it to pass through. The reaction is almost instant, so before people realize they’re getting hot, the garment could already be cooling them down. On the flip side, as a body cools down, the dynamic gating mechanism works in reverse to trap in heat.“The results of testing the material show that the textile was able to alter heat radiation by over 35% as it adjusted to the surrounding relative humidity,” the scientists said.

“The heat-adapting meta-fibers can be knit, dyed and washed similarly to other performance fabrics and are compatible with current commercial processes.”

Cut Resistant Clothing for the Glass and Metal Industry: CutPRO®

Cut resistant fabrics have been developed following thousands of injuries suffered by individuals in industry, homeland security, and extreme sports. Now, UK-based PPSS Group is urging product designers to think innovatively about the potential applications of its technical textile, Cut-Tex® PRO.

Since its inception, cut resistant fabric Cut-Tex® PRO has been effectively used in slash resistant clothing for law enforcement, security, and prisons and corrections personnel, as well as bite resistant clothing for healthcare professionals. Following extensive research and collaboration, the company launched its range of cut resistant clothing for the glass and metal industry: CutPRO®. CEO Robert Kaiser comments: “Since the beginning, we have been approached by individuals looking to use Cut-Tex® PRO for theft-proof beach bags, travel cases, storage protection, and even animal welfare. Whilst we cannot guarantee effective- ness in all applications without thorough testing, we have been delighted to work with so many innovative thinkers eager to use Cut-Tex® PRO as a solution for their  product.” The key benefits of fabric are its versatility and all-round performance. Not only does Cut-Tex® PRO offer EN388:2016 Level E cut resistance (ANSI Level 5), unlike alternatives, its protective properties are enhanced by the highest levels of tear and puncture resistance, decreasing the risk of sharp objects penetrating the fabric. It is also washable, lightweight and kind to skin, offering unlimited possibilities for developing new or existing products.

At pH 6.6, Cut-Tex®PRO has a pH value similar to that of water (usually between 6.5 and 8.5). This makes it an extremely low risk skin irritation fabric. Used in clothing for homeland security, workers in manufacturing, and healthcare professionals, it will maintain the skin’s natural balance whilst providing outstanding protection from cuts, slashes, and even human bites.

Robert Kaiser said that; “We are keen to partner with anyone who shares our excitement for the future of cut resistant fabric, and hope that new and innovative applications will help us to advance the performance and capabilities of Cut-Tex® PRO over the coming years.”

Kraig Biocraft Develops Silkworm Strain For USA Army

Kraig Biocraft Laboratories, developer of spider silk based fibres, has developed a strain of genetically engineered silkworms which produces fibres that have the physical properties more suited for use in protective textiles. The development has come under the company’s contract with the US Army. The company will scale up the production of new fibres.

Tentatively called Dragon Silk 2.0, this new strain is the next evolution in the development of protective fibres, built upon the company’s existing Dragon Silk, and is a further example of the company’s ability to adapt and tailor the properties of its recombinant spider silk materials to meet end market performance requirements. Through the use of its fibre performance testing capabilities, paired with a select breeding programme, the company created a strain that is stronger, yet less elastic, than the original Dragon Silk.

Specifically created in response to input from the Army, based on requirements for antiballistic applications, this new strain of recombinant spider silk silk- worms is the second phase of the company’s development agreement with the Army. Kraig Labs delivered shootpack panels to the Army, earlier this summer, made of its original Dragon Silk material and those panels are awaiting testing. “When the Army chose to award the second phase of this project we knew that we were given a great opportunity to prove the power of our technology and our approach using silkworms,” said COO, Jon Rice. “Today we’re thrilled to announce that our work was a success and that we now have a line of silkworms that produce a recombinant spider silk better matched for the demands of protective textile applications. We expect this new strain will play a critical role in our expansion and commercialisation of spider silk far beyond the market for bullet proof vests.”

Kraig Biocraft Laboratories Begins Scale Up Of Second Generation Dragon Silk

Consistent with the Company’s history of creating performance driven recombinant spider silk, this new material was specially designed at Kraig Labs’ Michigan research headquarters for application in protective textiles, where increased strength and decreased flexibility are expected to provide improved protection.

Scale up of Dragon Silk 2.0 is well underway, with the production team already raising tens of thousands of the new transgenic silkworms at the Company’s US based pilot production facility. Over the next 30 days, Kraig Labs anticipates scaling up production volumes of this new silkworm strain into the millions, as it prepares to create the first silk threads and fabrics made of this next generation recombinant spider silk.

Further, the Company is laying the groundwork to partner with experts in multicomponent thread design and spinning, to develop new specialty threads blending the performance spider silk with other traditional materials. This work is expected to develop threads and fabrics focused specifically on products for the perfor- mance wear and other closely linked market segments.

“The ability to rapidly scale up this newly announced material, from initial testing to pilot scale production, is a major differentiator in our approach, which utilizes silkworms and the existing global silk infrastructure,” said COO, Jon Rice. “The current global infrastructure, equipment and skilled labor, is able to produce more than 150,000 metric tons of conventional silk per year. Our recombinant spider silk silkworm technology is a direct drop-in replacement for traditional silkworms and allows us to move quickly, with minimal investment, to bring new products to market.”

Future scale up of Dragon Silk 2.0, as well as the Company’s other lines of recombinant spider silk silkworms, is expected to be transferred to the Company’s subsidiary Prodigy Textiles and its operations in Vietnam, while the Company’s US facility remains focused on the development of next generation materials.

Turkish Company Produces, German Army Uses

Developed by the Turkish company İltema, the fabric which was able to heat dissipate for a long time with low voltage was tested by the company in Germany and found successful. The fabric used by divers in the German army allows divers to stay bottom of the sea for longer.

İltema, which is focuses on heat dissipation technology established by two Turkish entrepreneurs at Dokuz Eylül University Technology Development Zone (DEPARK) continues to work on the development of new generation high-tech materials. The company, which started working in 2016 with the support of TÜBİTAK, has achieved successful results in heating technologies. İltema exhibits its products at the World Business Angels Investment Forum (WBAF). The company manufactures fabrics with yarns which are specially developed and coated with solutions. 100% locally produced fabrics heats with varying voltages. Fabrics which was heated with low-voltage do not threaten human health. Products can get heated by 48 volts and below.

Heat-Dissipating Fabrics With Low-Voltage Were First Exported To Germany

Smart fabrics, which preferred by the world’s leading countries and commercialised as “a new generation of electric blankets”, tested to be usedhybrid cars and in the defense industry in Germany and Turkey. The smart fabric, which was first exported to Germany, is used by the company there to make clothes produced for the use of divers in the German army. The divers of the German army, thanks to the clothes produced by using these fabrics, increased the 6-minute time stay in the bottom of the sea to 15 minutes.

The firm, which has been exporting to kazakhstan a tent that does not the snow settle on it, also has an anti-icing system on roads and stairs. This fabric, which is more cost effective, performs well in outdoor products such as automotive and defense industry. This fabric which is the most important feature is saving energy, saves 40 percent of heating in electric vehicles.

The company, which produces solar-heated coats for long-term stays in outside, also prepares heated tents and sleeping bags. In addition to being able to warm up with daylight, the jacket can also be charge mobile phones.

New Polyols Reduce Carbon Footprint From Covestro

Under the name cardyon™, Covestro is developing and marketing new polyether carbonate polyols that are produced with the aid of carbon dioxide (CO2). With Desmopan® 37385A the company now offers the first representative of a new series of thermoplastic polyurethanes (TPU) containing polyether carbonate polyols

Compared to conventional TPU materials, the new TPU products leave a lower carbon footprint and help close the carbon cycle. They also conserve fossil resources and, unlike many bio-based materials, do not compete with food production.

“With the new TPU, our customers can reduce the carbon footprint of their products and as a result play a pioneering role in sustainability vis-à-vis their competitors,” explains Georg Fuchte, TPU expert at Covestro. “This is especially true for companies in the consumer goods industry, which often manufacture products with a short lifespan.”

Excellent mechanical properties

Desmopan® 37385A has a hardness of 85 Shore A. Its mechanical properties are at least at the level of conventional TPU grades of similar hardness, and even exceed some of them. For example, it has a tensile strength of 36 megapascals. The elongation at break reaches 660 percent (DIN 53504). The plastic is designed for extrusion, but is also suitable for injection molding. “The application spectrum covers typical applications of conventional TPU grades with comparable hardness and ranges from soles and upper shoe components to sportswear, handles and knobs to packaging for sensitive electronics,” says Fuchte.

Different product variants

Covestro plans to expand the new TPU series with variants of different hardness. A product with a hardness of 95 Shore A, for example, whose melt cures rapidly during processing, is well advanced in development. “We are thus targeting applications in which economic production in short cycle times is particularly important,” explains Fuchte. Covestro cooperates closely with companies and research  institutions to use CO2 technology as a synthesis platform for other large-scale chemical raw materials. For example, work is underway on new CO2- based polyols for rigid polyurethane foams that could be used, for example, in the thermal insulation of buildings, in automobiles and in sports equipment. At the Dormagen plant, Covestro already operates a production plant that produces CO2-based polyols for flexible polyurethane foams. The latter are used in the commercial production of upholstered furniture and mattresses.