Effective Product from Toray in Combating Covid-19: Makspec® V Antiviral Textile

The company developed this 100% polyester offering in March 2020. It delivers exceptional washability and comfort.

Toray used the JISL 1922 antiviral test for textile products. It exposed samples to Covid-19 and measured concentrations two hours later. As with earlier experimentation using the ATCC VR-1679 envelope strain, the company confirmed that the fabric reduced more than 99.9% of Covid-19 viruses on textiles. It obtained this same result even after 50 industrial washing cycles, underscoring the fabric’s solid antiviral performance.

In view of the latest findings, the company will market this textile for customer service, nursing, and school uniforms for which demand to safeguard from Covid-19 is high. It also envisages expanding applications for this textile to also include sportswear, casual apparel, fashionwear, and children’s clothing.

Toray will draw on the textile processing technology it amassed in developing materials for uniforms, which demand exceptional functionality, to create textiles that provide outstanding performance and added value by combining comfort and safety, thus contributing to social progress.

The World’s First Fully Customisable and Zero-Waste 3D Printed Skirt

Fashion tech pioneer Julia Daviy has launched the world’s first zero-waste digitally customisable 3D-printed skirt.

A technology that allows zero-waste and cruelty-free clothing production becoming a reality with large-format professional 3D printing.

After ‘The Liberation Collection’ launched in 2018 at New York Fashion Week in 2018, Julia Daviy became obsessed with the idea of making 3D printed clothing commercially available, disrupting the idea of standardisation.

“It was critical to simplify digital customisation and 3D print wearable clothing with flexible materials. We’ve accomplished that, and I think that consumers will respond fast.”

“Our goal was never to demonstrate the viability of 3D printed clothin. We’ll have succeeded when beautiful, comfortable, ethically manufactured and environmentally friendly clothes are the standard” she added.

With a patented technology that uses 100 percent recyclable filaments, Julia and her team can meet the most exigent customer demands.

The team is being able not only to create highly customisable 3D printed garments according to consumers’ needs but also apparel of zero-waste for a cleaner and more sustainable world.

Production Phase          

Once the customers finalise their choice for a garment’s pattern, style, colour, waistline, and lining, Daviy and her team use the information to create a digital model of the garment.

Once modelled, the creation is approved by the client and sent to the 3D printers. The final product takes around ten days to complete.

Lenzing™ Fibers Help to Improve The Quality of Life for Butterfly Children

Undergarments, pajamas and bed linens tested for months. Moisture management of fibers reduce sweating and hence itching. Soft and smooth fibers lead to fewer skin injuries.  

The Lenzing Group, market leader for specialty fibers from the renewable raw material wood, has been providing both financial support and textiles made of its fibers to DEBRA Austria, the patient organization for “butterfly children.”

In recent months, several patients with the skin disorder Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) have tested leggings, undergarments, pajamas, quilts and bed linens made of TENCEL™ fibers and have found them to be comfortable and skin-friendly. The skin of EB patients is fragile like the wings of a butterfly. For this reason, coarse fibers, scratching seams, buttons, zippers and fibers which hardly or do not at all absorb sweat frequently lead to additional blisters and sores and increased itching. In contrast, TENCEL™ fibers feature particularly good moisture management and thus support the nature temperature-regulating properties of the body.

“Lenzing™ fibers are characterized by their special softness and are thus pleasant for the ‘butterfly children’ to wear”, says Stefan Doboczky, Chief Executive Officer of the Lenzing Group. “We are proud that textiles made of our fibers are very positively received by young and older EB patients and that we are able to make an important contribution here to improving their quality of life. We make use of positive feedback to develop new products which are even softer and more comfortable.” he adds.

“I am pleased that the Lenzing Group is devoting its attention to further developing specialty fibers, which is an important topic for ‘butterfly children’. This is because pleasant and soft garments which support the nature temperature regulation of the skin and thus a cool and dry feeling contribute to a better quality of life for younger and older patients on a daily basis”, states Rainer Riedl, father of a “butterfly child” and Chairman and Managing Director of DEBRA Austria.

Epidermolysis Bullosa (EB) is a genetic disease which is currently incurable. The skin of affected people is particularly vulnerable due to the lack of structural proteins, like the wings of a butterfly. This condition is the origin of the name “butterfly children”. Thanks to its TENCEL™ fibers, the Lenzing Group has a product which stands out due to its particular softness and high moisture absorption and therefore offers outstanding wearing comfort. The cooperation of DEBRA Austria and the Lenzing Group as well as other partners such as the Ebensee Fashion School will be continued due to the positive feedback.

University Of Borås Creating Textiles From Old Bread

Old bread may soon be used to make textiles. Scientist from the University of Borås are working in this direction and have already reported some success.

The research involves growing filamentous fungi on bread waste in bioreactors, and then creating yarn and nonwoven textiles in two different processes. Protein form the filaments can be used as food.

“We have seen that much of the food waste from grocery stores is from bread and therefore we wanted to see how we could turn it into a new product,” says Akram Zamani, senior lecturer in Resource Recycling at the University of Borås, the scientist involved in the project.

In the research, filamentous fungi will be grown on bread waste in bioreactors, and will then be used in two different processes to create yarn and to produce nonwoven textiles. “When the bread has become a biomass of fungi, we remove the protein which in turn can be used as food or animal feed. We use the cell wall fibres that remain of the fungi partly to spin a yarn, and partly to create nonwoven fabrics,” Zamani says.

“We have done a large part of the cultivation already, and it has worked well, so now we are working on a wet spinning process to create yarn, and test different methods to improve the yarn’s properties,” she says.

It is hoped that the fungus will be able to be transformed and used for clothing, medical applications, or furniture textiles. During the first two years, the product will be made on a smaller scale, in order to be scaled up during the third and fourth years.

“There is no previous research on this; therefore it is difficult to know what to expect,” says Zamani and continues: “We get the bread from a local grocery store, and we are able to collect as much as we need, which gives us the opportunity to test different things and make sure it becomes a good product.”

In addition to researchers in resource recovery and textile technology at the University of Borås, KTH, RISE Innventia and Sahlgrenska University Hospital are also included in the project. The project is being financed by Vinnova and is over four years.

Researchers Produced Materials to Replace Plastic

Aalto University and VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) scientists have produced a new bio-based material by uniting wood cellulose fibres and the silk protein found in spider web threads.

The material – very firm and resilient – may be used in the future to replace plastic, as part of bio-based composites and in medical applications, surgical fibres, the textile industry and packaging.

Achieving strength and extensibility at the same time has so far been a great challenge in material engineering. Increasing strength has meant losing extensibility and vice versa. The new material overcomes this challenge.

According to Aalto University Professor Markus Linder, nature offers great ingredients for developing new materials, such as firm and easily available cellulose and tough and flexible silk as used in this research. The advantage with both of these materials is that, unlike plastic, they are biodegradable and do not damage nature the same way micro-plastics do.

“Our researchers just need to be able to reproduce the natural properties,” adds Linder, who led the research.

“We used birch tree pulp, broke it down to cellulose nanofibrils and aligned them into a stiff scaffold. At the same time, we infiltrated the cellulosic network with a soft and energy dissipating spider silk adhesive matrix,” said research scientist Pezhman Mohammadi from VTT.

Silk is a natural protein which is excreted by animals like silkworms and also found in spider web threads. The spider web silk used by Aalto University researchers, however, is not actually taken from spider webs but is instead produced by the researchers using bacteria with synthetic DNA.

“Because we know the structure of the DNA, we can copy it and use this to manufacture silk protein molecules which are chemically similar to those found in spider web threads. The DNA has all this information contained in it,” Linder explains.

“Our work illustrates the new and versatile possibilities for protein engineering. In the future, we could manufacture similar composites with slightly different building blocks and achieve a different set of characteristics for other applications. Currently, we are working on making new composite materials as implants, impact resistance objects and other products,” says Mohammadi.

The research project is part of the work of the Centre of Excellence in Molecular Engineering of Biosynthetic Hybrid Materials (HYBER). The research has been published in Science Advances.

ANDRITZ launches new StrataPress SX single-seam press felt technology

International technology Group ANDRITZ has launched its new-generation “StrataPress™ SX” felt with integrated single-seam technology.

  • Integrated seam for faster and safer installation
  • Most efficient water removal for reduced energy consumption
  • Available with exclusive “QS” technology for superior sheet smoothness
  • Enhanced seam flap integrity for longer lifetime

StrataPress SX is specifically engineered for the most demanding positions in paperboard/packaging, graphical, and pulp machines. Its integrated seam ensures strength and durability while delivering rapid and safe installation.

It is specially designed with a game-changing combination of materials, base fabric structures and unique batt concepts that deliver the highest sheet quality, faster machine speeds, reduced energy consumption, and extended life potential.

“With StrataPress SX, for the first time in our industry, customers can now enjoy the convenience and safety of seam felts along with the superior machine performance previously only available from premium-class endless press felts. And with its unique compressibility and nip dampening characteristics, StrataPress SX provides that superior dewatering performance even in the hardest press nip applications, and with reduced operating costs,” says Bill Butterfield, Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer at ANDRITZ Fabrics and Rolls.

STRATAPRESS SX – THREE PRODUCT CLASSES

As StrataPress SX technology is built utilizing three distinct warp systems, there is an exact product specification specially engineered to maximize machine performance for graphical, board and packaging, and pulp grades.

StrataPress SX is also available with ANDRITZ’s exclusive “QS” Quick Saturation technology. Hydrophilic components embedded in the base fabric structure ensure optimized water management to provide improved start-up behavior, enhanced profiles and better NIP dewatering over the entire service lifetime.

With the new StrataPress SX technology, ANDRITZ once again confirms its position as one of the global market leaders for the supply of innovative fabrics, press felts, and roll technology solutions.

For more information, please visit andritz.com/fabrics-and-rolls.

First Devan R-Vital® CBD-Infused Textiles Hit the Market

With the recent launch of Acabada ProActiveWear, the first CBD-infused textiles are officially hitting the market. The fabric treatment behind the CBD-infused textiles was developed by Devan Chemicals, a Belgian company specialized in functional finishes for the worldwide textile markets.

Devan launched its CBD (Cannabidiol) fabric treatment at Heimtextil 2019 in Frankfurt as part of their R-Vital® range of microencapsulated active ingredients. The range contains active substances like Aloe Vera, Q10, Vitamin E… with CBD being its latest addition. Now, only 8 months later, the first CBD-infused products are hitting the market.

High-quality organic CBD

Born in 2019, Acabada ProActiveWear is the world’s first and only CBD-infused activewear brand, committed to creating innovative, luxury apparel for the proactive woman. Conceptualized in New York and produced in Portugal, Acabada infuses luxury fabric with the highest quality organic CBD, to ensure that women will look, feel and perform at their best. Thanks to the close and intense cooperation between Acabada, Devan and the Portuguese production partner, goods were in store in less than five months starting from initial contact.

With over 30 years in the apparel industry, Acabada CEO and Co-Founder Seth Baum recognized the positive effects of CBD on pain and inflammation and the fact that top athletes embrace the active ingredient as a part of their training and recovery ritual. Baum assembled a team of experienced fashion designers, including Co-Founder and CCO Katrina Petrillo, and together they created a high fashion yet innovative product that is primed to disrupt the market. “While typical CBD products such as tinctures and edibles are growing exponentially in popularity, we began to envision a product that addressed health and wellness through a different lens. By physically infusing CBD into our garments, our product live at the intersection of fashion, fitness, and wellness,” says Baum. With Acabada ProActiveWear, recovery starts from the moment you get dressed by helping to fight soreness and promote healing before the first squat, lunge or crunch.

Each garment from Acabada ProActiveWear contains up to 25 grams of zero-THC, lab-certified, 99.9% pure CBD, which will allow the benefits to last through 40 high-intensity wear and wash cycles. As customers approach 40 wears and washes, they can choose to sustainably recycle their CBD-infused garments through Acabada’s upcycling program, where the recycled, synthetic fabrics will be repurposed where needed as commercial materials.

Microencapsulation

Through a scientific process called microencapsulation, CBD molecules are strategically infused into luxe, high-performance fabrics by wrapping microscopic droplets of zero-THC, hemp-derived CBD with a protective coating. Using Devan’s patented textile finishing treatment, the microcapsules bond to the fibres in the fabric. Strategically placed within the garments to align with muscle groups, the microcapsules gradually open over time as each layer meets with friction from your skin. When the individual capsules break open, the CBD is released and trans-dermally absorbed, where it interacts with your body’s endocannabinoid system (ECS) to help regulate and reduce pain and inflammation caused by physical activities. In the meantime, Devan has put together extensive research and testing documentation in order to accommodate questions from brands and retailers on this trendy subject.

Aalto University Uses Palm Wax For Water Resistance

Amidst concerns over use of c to make textiles waterproof, scientists from Aalto University have used an ecological method to make garments water-resistant with wax obtained from Brazilian palm tree leaves. The treatment is non-toxic and doesn’t impair breathability.

Aalto researchers have developed an ecological and water repellent wax particle coating suitable for wood cellulose fibres, which also retains the breathability and natural feel of the textile. The coating uses carnauba wax, which is also used in such things as medicines, foodstuffs, as well as the surface treatment of fruits and car waxes. The new coating is suitable not only for textiles but also for other cellulose-based materials.

During the processing, the wax is thawed and decomposed in water into wax particles that are anionic (negatively charged) just like cellulose. For the wax particles to adhere well to the cellulose surface, something cationic (positively charged) is needed as a buffer, since the oppositely charged particles attract one another. In previous studies, a natural protein called polylysine was used for this.

However, as Aalto University PhD student Nina Forsman points out, “Polylysine is very expensive so in our current study, it’s been substituted with a much cheaper, cationic starch that’s already commercially available.” Though cationic starch is not quite as effective as polylysine, two layers of the starch mixed with two wax particles are sufficient to make the textile waterproof.

The researchers compared the breathability of textiles treated with natural wax with textiles that had been treated with commercial products. Ecological wax particles made the textiles waterproof and also retained their breathability, while textiles treated with commercial controls had reduced breathability.

The multidisciplinary research team also included designer Matilda Tuure from the Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture and as part of her master’s thesis, she designed and manufactured three coats for which the wax coatings were put through their paces.

The wax coating can be applied to the textile by dipping, spraying or brushing onto the surface of the textile, and all three methods were tested. They found that dipping is suitable for smaller items of clothing and spraying or brushing is better for larger ones. In industrial-scale production, wax treatment could be part of the textile finishing process along with the colour pigmentation of the wax, which makes dyeing and waterproofing possible at the same time.

The team found that the wax coating is not resistant to detergent washing, so the product is best suited for less frequently washed outer garments such as jackets. For the sake of simplicity of use, the consumer could potentially apply the coating themselves to the textile after each wash, and this requires more research and development though.

The effect of the drying temperature after wax treatment on waterproofing was also observed, and it was concluded that the best water resistance is obtained when the drying temperature is lower than the melting temperature of the wax.

“We tested the coating on different textile materials: viscose, tencel, cotton, hemp and cotton knitwear. We found that the surface roughness of textiles affects how well it repels water – the rougher the surface, the better. This is because, on a rough surface, water droplets contact the textile surface in a smaller area,” says Forsman.

VEOCEL™ Takes Initiative With ‘Hands On’ Motto To Draw Attention To Hidden Plastics In Wet Wipes

Intriguing information is shared regarding the plastics hidden inside wet wipes that are widely used in our everyday lives during the press conference held by Lenzing Group to raise environmental awareness.

Accordingly, less than 10% of the consumers are aware of the fact that most of the wet wipes have considerable amount of plastic material inside them. Lenzing introduced VEOCEL™ fibers in order to guide consumers who would like to make sustainable and environment-friendly buying decisions as well as the ‘Hands On’ initiative aiming to promote the consumers to purchase biodegradable products.

Manufacturing environment-friendly special fibers from renewable wood raw material, Lenzing Group held a press conference intending to increase environmental awareness to promote the usage of more sustainable raw materials.

Lenzing Global Nonwovens Business Management Vice President Jurgen Eizinger spoke at the press conference, in which notable information was shared regarding the plastics hidden inside the products that are widely used in our everyday livesand stated that they produced special fibers using environment-friendly and innovative technologies, and moreover, contributed to raise environmental awareness of the sector and consumers.

In this regard, Eizinger indicated that VEOCEL™ brand was released to the market as the new nonwoven brand of the Lenzig Group, adding “More people are using wet wipes in everyday life due to their being practical, hygienic and ready to use. However, studies reveal very few people know that most of these wet wipes contain considerable amount of plastic materials and would harm the environment if not disposed of properly. According to sectoral data, less than 10% of the consumers are aware of the fact that wet wipes have fossil based plastics in them. In the meantime, 9 out of 10 people stated that they would prefer to use a biodegradable alternative.”

Eizinger reminded that parallel to the efforts of the lawmakers who try to diminish global plastic waste amount, European Union (EU) recently released a directive regarding single-use plastic products proceeded with the following, “According to this new EU initiative, wet wipe packages will have to be marked concerning the negative effects to the environment and they will have to be disposed of properly. The wood-based, botanical-origin fibers of the Lenzing Group offers an alternative to the fossil based plastic materials inside the wet wipes. These botanical-origin fibers produced by renewable wood material with an environment-friendly production process are completely biodegradable in sea and land recycling to nature.

If the wet wipe package has VEOCEL™ logo on it, the product is 100% biodegradable

Miray Demirer Acar, Head of Turkey & Middle East and Africa Marketing Communication and Branding Department, expressed that the consumers could take a step forward by going for the biodegradable products in order to reduce the plastic waste in the sea and therefore had launched the ‘Hands On’ initiative. Acar indicated that, with the ‘Hands On’ initiative, they aimed to foster a dialog among the wet wipe customers with environmental consciousness, sustainability experts, and people sharing similar concerns to promote the usage of environment-friendly and more sustainable raw materials. Acar added “With this initiative, we wanted to raise awareness about the hidden plastic materials inside the wet wipes that are omnipresent in everyday life. Day by day, the amount of plastic waste in the sea increases which endangers both human health as well as the nature. If we pay attention to the contents of the products we use and prefer sustainable and environment-friendly ones, we can pass a better world on to the next generations. As a manufacturer, we try to fulfill our responsibility by producing sustainable and environment-friendly raw materials. The consumers should realize that their buying decisions are significant and therefore can realize a better future by going towards environment-aware choices.”

Acar also drew attention to the fact that the consumers who desire to make a sustainable shopping decision were in need of a good guidance and assurance. Acar concluded her remarks as: “Therefore, in the beginning of this year, we announced new certification criteria for our VEOCEL™ brand. Accordingly, only biodegradable botanic-origin fibers can be used in VEOCEL™ wet wipes. Consumers will be certain that their purchase is sustainable and environment-friendly when they see the VEOCEL™ logo as a ‘Trusted Brand’ on the packaging.”

Ajman University Develops Garment System to Help Autistic People

Two lecturers at Ajman University (AU) have developed a smart garment ecosystem which can determine the wearer’s stress level and trigger clothes and accessories’ functionalities accordingly to help understand and better control overwhelming situations and emotions.

This may help in monitoring physiological parameters indicating stress in autistic people.

The system ‘Sensewear’, has been developed by Emanuela Corti and Ivan Parati, lecturers with the Department of Interior Design, College of Architecture, Art and Design, Ajman University.

“Through a comfortable, wearable and customisable tech solution embedding textile sensors, we will be able to constantly monitor selected physiological parameters revealing a stressful condition,” Corti said.

The system comprises a sensing unit, a smart t-shirt, embedding textile sensors connected to an electronic device and satellite garments that embed the therapeutic functionalities. “An app for smartphone and tablet will help in visualising the wearer condition facing different situations, record data and progress with the scope of monitoring the wearer,” Corti said.

Corti and Parati have been awarded the top prize at Gitex Future Starts for this pioneering product.

AU lecturers were inspired by the senses and therapies applied to the Sensory Processing Disorders (SPD) that is a common condition in autism where “the natural interface to the outside world is often impaired preventing a regular interaction with people and environment.” Anxiety, stress and panic attack – some of the autism’s symptoms – proved to be affecting a variety of people without disabilities, she added. “We realised that garments can have a positive impact on a bigger audience.”

The product has been and will be continuously developed in cooperation with autistic children, their families and their therapists, she pointed out. “Autistic children bear a load of emotions, but often find it difficult to control them and to make them understandable for the people who care about them.”

Unobtrusive measurement of physiological parameters will give indication of the stress level of the individual in real-time alarming guardians and therapist in case of detected emergency. They will also give an instant assessment of therapies’ benefits.